Indigenous Environmental Justice Research Symposium

Current and former contributors to the Indigenous Environmental Justice Project came together for the Indigenous Environmental Justice Research Symposium on November 23, 2019. The symposium posed an opportunity for students, researchers and activists to present a diverse range of projects and to bolster future opportunities for collaboration between Indigenous peoples and the York community. From methods used to lessons learned, presentations were shared with approximately 85 attendees who were encouraged to dialogue with the presenters. Find the full report with descriptions of the speakers and their research here. 

Anishinaabe artist Patricia Martin lent her talents to the symposium, creating graphic representations to help attendees digest and reflect upon the information shared.

Special thanks to Sue Chiblow for starting the symposium with an opening prayer. 

Download the Indigenous Environmental Justice Research Symposium Highlight Report

All presentations were recorded for the IEJ Project Symposium Podcast series, to continue amplifying this work beyond the bounds of academia and into the future. Find the episodes and their descriptions listed below. 

Keynote

Sylvia Plain
Research in Motion
Sylvia Plain, community organizer/leader, water walker and canoe builder is a graduate from the University of Toronto (B.A. Political Science). She is from Aamjiwnaang First Nation and has travelled all over the world to learn about and participate in canoe culture. She founded and coordinated the Great Lakes Canoe project, engaging Indigenous youth to build a birch bark canoe.

Panelists

Max Corne-Klein
Food Sovereignty, Climate Change and Indigenous Environmental Justice
Max Corne-Klein, recent Master of Environmental Studies graduate from YorkU presents his MES research, which focused on the creation of a podcast highlighting an analysis of IEJ as a necessary prerequisite for Indigenous food sovereignty and climate action.

Jayce Chiblow
Anishinaabe & Climate Change
Anishinaabe kwe Jayce Chiblow, a recent Master of Environmental Studies graduate from YorkU, shares her research on climate change and climate action in her community of Garden River First Nation, Ontario, with a focus on the utilization of land-based learning.

Mahisha Sritharan
Impacts of Climate Change on Whitefish River First Nation
Mahisha Sritharan, Master of Environmental Studies graduate from YorkU, speaks on her research around climate justice and understanding the impacts of climate change in Whitefish River First Nation, ON.

Nasreen Hussain
Significance of Water: A Critical Reflection
Nasreen Hussain, Master of Environmental Studies graduate from YorkU, presents her documentary short, The Significance of Water, and speaks to her research on human relationships to water.

Courtney Arseneau
Free, prior and informed decision-making about proposed development in Indigenous Territories in northern Ontario
Courtney Arseneau, a PhD graduate in Community Psychology from Wilfred Laurier, discusses her research around Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC), and her experience working with Matawa First Nation.

Nicole Latiluppe
Indigenous Environmental Justice: Community Perspectives and Practices from the Research
Nicole Latiluppe, Assistant Professor in the department of Human Geography and Physical and Environmental Sciences at the University of Toronto, provides insights into her work for the IEJ project, outlining the importance of language, decolonization, and fostering Indigenous ways of knowing and being.

IEJ Symposium 2019

Episode 1 – Research In Motion

Episode 2 - Food Sovereignty, Climate Change and Indigenous Environmental Justice

Episode 3 - Anishinaabe & Climate Change

Episode 4 – Impacts of Climate Change on Whitefish River First Nation

Episode 5 – The Significance of Water: A Critical Reflection

Episode 6 – Free, Prior & Informed Decision-Making About Proposed Development on Indigenous Territories in Northern Ontario

Episode 7 – Indigenous Environmental Justice: Community Perspectives and Practices from the Research

 

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Jayce Chiblow, a recent graduate from the Masters of Environmental Studies program at York, presents her work on “Anishinaabe and Climate Change,” research that was conducted in her community of Garden River First Nation. Photo by Sophia Troop Attendees were encouraged to take notes during and ask questions following the symposium presentations. Photo by Sophia Troop Recent Master in Environmental Studies graduate from York, Mahisha Sritharan, delivers speaks about her research on “Impacts of Climate Change on Whitefish River First Nation. Photo by Sophia Troop Indingeous Environmental Justice Project principal investigator Dr. Deborah McGregor cheers on her students as they head to the podium. Photo by Sophia Troop (B.A. Political Science/University of Toronto) Sylvia Plain, from Aamjiwnaang First Nation, delivers the symposium keynote on the Great Lakes Canoe Journey program, which she both founded and coordinates. The program is land-based and promotes intergenerational education, teaching Indigenous communities about Anishinaabe technology and birch bark canoe building. Photo by Sophia Troop Anishinaabe artist Patricia Martin lent her talents to the Research Symposium. She spent the day recording graphic notes – here is her representation of keynote speaker Sylvia Plain’s talk on the Great Canoe Journey program. Photo by Sophia Troop