Videos

Taking Action

Taking Action

Passing down knowledge to younger generations and planting seeds for the future and making them aware of their responsibilities to the environment is important when considering environmental justice. Grandmother Josephine walked around the Great Lakes and motivated many to connect to the water and land through fasting, song and ceremony. Putting knowledge back into communities, being grateful every day for what we have and speaking on behalf of the environment are all some ways to take action!

Understanding Indigenous Environmental Justice

Understanding Indigenous Environmental Justice

Indigenous peoples have been on Turtle Island for thousands of years and have held their own knowledge systems and ways of ordering society. Indigenous Environmental Justice is embedded within these knowledge systems. “Bimaadziwin” in Anishnaabe language refers to living life in a good way which considers all relationships within Creation and maintaining a balance through being responsible and reciprocal. An example of this would be taking only what one needs and giving back, ensuring there is enough for the future.

What is Indigenous Environmental Injustice?

What is Indigenous Environmental Justice?

Indigenous peoples have a connection to the land and water in their territories enabling them to live with resources their peoples traditionally relied on for thousands of years. When the government or industries force communities to relocate or occupy space on the land due to production or business, this creates a disconnect to the land for Indigenous communities that threatens their health and traditional way of life, due to resource extraction that pollutes water, land and air, negatively impacting animals and people.

Why Indigenous Environmental Justice Matters

Why Indigenous Environmental Justice Matters

Indigenous Environmental Justice considers land water, animals, spiritual entities and ancestors, all having a say in how justice is enacted and applied to sustain the environment for future generations. Justice is a concept built within Indigenous knowledge systems. Language plays a large role in justice as it carries worldviews and philosophy and how it connects everything to in Creation.

IEJ Symposium - May 2016

Kyle Whyte: Climate Change, Traditional Knowledge & Environmental Justice

Climate Change, Traditional Knowledge & Environmental Justice
Water (Nibi) Justice & Law Panel 

Water (Nibi) Justice & Law Panel
Young People's Roundtable on Environmental Justice 

Young People's Roundtable on Environmental Justice
Perspectives on Indigenous Environmental Justice 

Perspectives on Indigenous Environmental Justice
Dan Longboat: The Revitalization of the Human Spirit, Haudenosaunee Perspectives on Environment & Justice

Dan Longboat: The Revitalization of the Human Spirit
Dallas Goldtooth: Pipelines Sacrificing Sacred Sites, Sacred Lands

Dallas Goldtooth: Pipelines Sacrificing Sacred Sites, Sacred Lands
Arvol Looking Horse:  Pipelines Sacrificing Sacred Sites, Sacred Lands

Arvol Looking Horse: Pipelines Sacrificing Sacred Sites, Sacred Lands
Nancy Deleary: Honouring my Grandmothers & Grandfathers

Nancy Deleary: Honouring my Grandmothers & Grandfathers
Annie Clair: Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequalities & Community Health Project

Annie Clair: Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequalities & Community Health Project
Ingrid Waldron: Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequalities & Community Health Project

Ingrid Waldron:Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequalities & Community Health Project
Dawn Martin-Hill: Injustice of Alberta's Blood Oil

Grandmother Dorene Bernard: Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequalities & Community Health Project

Grandmother Dorene Bernard:Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequalities & Community Health Project
Kristie Dotson, Taryn Bobbiwash & Quinn Meawasige Symposium Reflections: Indigenous Environmental Justice & Law

Kristie Dotson, Taryn Bobbiwash & Quinn Meawasige: Indigenous Environmental Justice & Law

Speaker Series 2016-2017

Speaker Series: Sylvia Plain, Great Lakes Canoe Journey


Sylvia Series: Sylvia Plain Great Lakes Canoe Journey
Speaker Series: Isabel Altamirano Jimenez

Speaker Series: Isabel Altamirano Jimenez
Speaker Series: Adrianne Lickers, "From Longhouse to Greenhouse"

Speaker Series: Native Youth Sexual Health Network
Speaker Series: Vanessa Gray, "Environmental Racism in Canada's Chemical Valley"
Speaker Series: Native Youth Sexual Health Network
Native Youth Sexual Health Network (NYSHN): Video Recording - Will be posted on the NYSHN website soon. 

Elders & Youth Climate Change Gathering 2017